Royal News

How Kate Middleton broke one of Queen’s strictest rules on recent engagement

The Duchess of Cambridge always looks impeccable but there are actually lots of rules around what she can wear when carrying out her royal duties.

Kate Middleton is known for following the many royal rules with her outfits – including not wearing colourful nail varnish and carrying her bag in her left hand.

The royal mum-of-three even had her wedding dress approved by her grandmother-in-law to be.

But it looks like the top royal broke one of the Queen’s top fashion rules when she appeared on screen wearing black at a virtual public engagement recently.

The Queen, and other royals, typically only wear black when attending a funeral.

Kate appeared to brush royal protocol to one side and opted to wear a black trouser and jacket suit for an appearance at the newly reopened Natural History Museum.

“She is in a fitted jacket with satin lapels, sharply angled pockets at the hips, a chest welt pocket, and padded, peak shoulders. Many of these are signature design elements for Alexander McQueen, but we’ve not been able to locate this exact jacket for sale anywhere or in archive photos,” website What Kate Wore reports.

The Duchess, who is a keen photographer herself, was announcing the details for the W ildlife Photographer of the Year 2020.

Speaking to camera, inside the Hintze Hall, Kate said: “I’m delighted to be announcing the grand title winner of the 56th Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.”

She went on: “The skill and creativity of this year’s images provide a moving and fascinating insight into the beauty and vulnerability of life on our planet.

“So it’s with great pleasure that I can announce this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner is….”

The camera then switches to the nominees all watching from their homes, as Kate adds: “Sergey Gorshkov, for his image The Embrace.”

She went on to thank all those who entered the competition.

Russian photographer Mr Gorshkov’s image shows a Siberian tigress hugging a fir tree.

He gave viewers a “unique glimpse” of the majestic beast, beating 49,000 entries from around the world to scoop the top prize in the prestigious contest with his image which took more than 11 months to capture with hidden cameras.

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London, where an exhibition opens on Friday October 16, before touring across the UK and internationally to venues in countries including Australia, Canada, Denmark and Germany.

The museum said limited visitor numbers and safety measures in light of Covid-19 will ensure that visitors have a “safe and welcoming experience” and are able to see the pictures in a crowd-free gallery.

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